How-to Review 10 Phone Calls In CallRail & Track Where Calls Are Originating From

In The Marketing Box 2, we discussed the importance of perfecting telephonic interactions. We also discussed how critical this is for acquiring new patients. To be a successful marketer, however, it’s not only about the quality of your practice’s telephonic interactions, but also understanding which marketing efforts are generating these calls. So, the question we […]

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In The Marketing Box 2, we discussed the importance of perfecting telephonic interactions. We also discussed how critical this is for acquiring new patients. To be a successful marketer, however, it’s not only about the quality of your practice’s telephonic interactions, but also understanding which marketing efforts are generating these calls. So, the question we want to answer now is: Where are calls coming from? 

In The Marketing Box 1, we helped you set up CallRail and connect it to Google Tag Manager. This allows you to see where calls originate. While software like Google Analytics can provide information when someone clicks somewhere on your site, having a dedicated call tracking number with CallRail helps you have an even better understanding of what happens beyond these analytics. For this task, we encourage you to review 10 phone calls with your new awesome headphones! Most importantly, we are going to look at where your incoming calls are originating from.

Why You Should Identify Where Calls Are Originating From

By determining where calls are coming from, you can adjust your marketing efforts accordingly and make strategic decisions. Understanding how organic, paid, and referral traffic influence your business’ call conversions will help you figure out where to focus your marketing energy. Using CallRail for this purpose makes it easier for you, as a DIY marketer, to distinguish which platforms are bringing in more calls than others. 

What You Should Look Out For

  • If a large portion of your calls are coming from Google organic, it means those callers found your website naturally via your Google My Business page. In this case, make sure you have good content on your website that will be appealing to potential patients.  Make sure your website landing page showcases your practice and that your practice contact number is easily accessible. 
  • If a large portion of your calls are coming from Facebook Ads or other ads, good practice would be to keep pushing ads on that channel. Remember the saying, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Or, in this case, run more ads where it makes sense. By going to your Facebook Ads account, you will be able to see the click-through rate to your website or, if you used a “Call Now” button on your ad, you will be able to see how many potential patients have clicked on each ad. 
  • In Task 4 of this box, we are going to help you make sense of key performance indicators on Facebook Ads. This will also help you better determine which ads are performing best and, by comparing these statistics to your CallRail statistics, you will be able to determine which ads are generating calls to your practice. By reviewing these types of analytics, you are making strategic marketing decisions which is the best way to outperform your competition.
  • It is also essential to look at the “device type.” If you see that most calls are coming from mobile devices, it’s vital that your website is mobile-friendly. If you were not involved in the development of your website, it would be a good idea to contact your developer and confirm that your website is mobile-friendly. You can also use this as an indicator to run ads targeted on mobile devices, e.g., Facebook ads. 

And that’s it! Before you go, We would once again like to remind you of the importance of listening to calls on CallRail at least once a month. It is important for you to stay up to date with the type of questions potential patients are asking and also the type of answers the front desk is providing. Perfecting telephonic interaction at the front desk is a continuous effort, not just a one-time thing.