How To Set Up Google Tag Manager

Note: These instructions are for WordPress websites only. Confirm with your website team/builder that your site is built on WordPress. If you have a website that is not built on WordPress (HTML, Wix, Squarespace, etc), contact your IT department or current website company for additional instructions on how to create and set up Google Tag […]

Note: These instructions are for WordPress websites only. Confirm with your website team/builder that your site is built on WordPress. If you have a website that is not built on WordPress (HTML, Wix, Squarespace, etc), contact your IT department or current website company for additional instructions on how to create and set up Google Tag Manager. Google Tag Manager will be needed to complete future tasks in The Marketing Box series, so be sure to install it!

What Is Google Tag Manager?

Google Tag Manager can be seen as the middle-man of your digital analytics implementation and an easy way to embed tracking code in your website without a developer. It’s a fast and simple way for you to deploy, modify, and manage your website tags all in one place, without writing a single line of code.

How Does Google Tag Manager Work?

Here are the basics of how GTM works. When a potential or an existing patient is scrolling and clicking on your website we want to be able to see how they are engaging with your website, right? By implementing tags on your website, you are able to funnel this information from one data source (your website) to another data source (Google Analytics). GTM is especially handy when you have lots of tags to manage because all of the code is stored in one place.

There are two main parts to Google Tag Manager:

  • Tags: Every action that happens on a website has a separate tag, which is made up of Snippets of Javascript or tracking pixels. If somebody browsing your website clicks on the “Book an appointment” button on your website, you want to be able to track it. That button (as well as any other button you want to track) has a tag and when it is triggered it will send information to your Google Analytics to form stats.
  • Triggers: Tags depend on triggers. A trigger listens for certain events, such as clicks, form submissions, or page loads. When an event is detected that matches the trigger definition, any tags that reference that trigger will fire. Triggers tell GTM when or how to fire a tag. For example, maybe you want to have a tag send information when someone clicks to make an appointment, or when a form is submitted. These sorts of events are known as triggers and all tags need to have at least one trigger assigned to them to ensure data is collected.

Why Use Google Tag Manager?

  • Easy to Use: One of the greatest benefits of Google Tag Manager is that it has a basic user interface that allows you to create most of your tags without writing a single line of code.
  • Time Saver: GTM will help speed up many processes. Changes to existing tags and creating new tags can be made in just a few minutes.
  • Improves site speed: An issue with traditional tracking tags is that if they fire synchronously, they can slow down site speeds. When tags fire synchronously, one tag being slow to load slows down all the other tags that are waiting on it. The problem with this is that the longer your website takes to load, the more likely it is that a potential patient will leave without converting. Luckily, tags created in GTM fire asynchronously, meaning each tag can fire anytime it’s ready to which ensures the best performance.
  • Tags can be modified with ease: GTM allows you to manage your tags. You can create and update your tags within the tag manager interface and then deploy these tags with ease and speed, without having to make actual code changes to your website.
  • Debug Options: It’s very important that you make sure your tags work BEFORE you publish them to your website. Lucky for you, GTM has a built-in debug feature that allows you to test and debug each update before publishing the change. This is a great way to see your changes in real-time, without risking the public seeing those changes before they are ready.

How To Install Google Tag Manager

Step 1

The first step to install Google tag manager is to go to Google.com, and log in with your preferred Google account.

Step 2

Once you have logged in with your preferred email address, go to tagmanager.google.com. Here you can now create a new account and tag manager, and for your account name, place your practice. It is recommended that you only have one account per practice to keep things simple. Once you have entered your company name you must set up your “container” which is a small piece of code from which data will flow, into various tools (e.g Google Analytics). Enter your website address here, eg. www.BobtheDentist.com, and select “web” where it asks “Where to Use Container“. Once you click “Create”, read the terms of service and click “Yes”.

Step 3

Google tag manager will now provide a pop up showing some code that you will need to install on your WordPress website. 

Step 4

To do this, you will need to go over to your website for which you have the login information, and go to the plug-in section and select “Add New”.

Step 5

You will then need to search for the “Insert Headers and Footers” plugin and install/activate it. 

Step 6

Once the plugin is installed, you will navigate to “settings” where you will see an action button called “Insert Headers and Footer”. Now you will simply need to go back to the Google Tags Manager tab you left open and copy the code in the <head> section and paste it in the “Scripts in Header” section on WordPress. You will then do the same for the <body> section of code and paste it in the “Scripts in Body” section of WordPress. Then click Save.

Step 7

Now you’ve got Google tag manager installed on your website. This will also be good for you to install future things such as CallRail and Google Analytics.

That was pain-free, wasn’t it? And you did it yourself!